Authorities in New Hampshire are investigating hundreds of potential voting fraud cases based on data showing that at least 458 people may have lied about their residency when casting their vote in the 2016 presidential election.

On election day last year, a total 5,903 people voted in New Hampshire using an ID from other states, which is permitted by state law. However, that law requires those without a New Hampshire ID to produce evidence of domicile in the state, notes NH1.

Following up on the votes cast with proof of out-of-state IDs, the NH Secretary of State sent out "6,033 letters to voters with no proof of domicile and so far 458 of the letters have bounced back as undeliverable – a clear sign those who filled them out lied," suggests the American Mirror.

Additionally, the NH Secretary of State’s office sent out another 764 letters to "voters who cast a ballot without a satisfactory photo identification" in this past presidential election. There has yet to be confirmation on how many of those letters bounced back as undeliverable.

Soon following the election, then-President-elect Donald Trump claimed there was "serious" voter fraud, directly citing New Hampshire as an example:

Trump fell short of the electoral votes in NH to Democrat Hillary Clinton by just under 3,000 votes.

The president would further claim in February that he and former senator Kelly Ayotte were victims of voter fraud in the state. The Washington Post followed up on the claim, running a story headlined, "We can't find any evidence of voter fraud in New Hampshire":

President Trump and his staff continue to claim that voter fraud tainted the 2016 election. Most recently, Trump said that Massachusetts residents were bused into New Hampshire to vote. According to Trump adviser Stephen Miller, “I can tell you that this issue of busing voters into New Hampshire [from Massachusetts] is widely known by anyone who’s worked in New Hampshire politics. It’s very real. It’s very serious.”

Trump also alleged that former Republican senator Kelly Ayotte would not have lost to Democrat Maggie Hassan if Massachusetts voters hadn’t illegally voted in New Hampshire.

Moreover, in a public statement, federal election commissioner Ellen L. Weinstraub called Trump's claims “extraordinarily serious and specific," demanding he "share his evidence with the public and with the appropriate law enforcement authorities so that his allegations may be investigated promptly and thoroughly.

“The scheme the President of the United States alleges would constitute thousands of felony criminal offenses under New Hampshire law,” she added.

Although real instances of voter fraud abound, the left continues to deny the claim. Perhaps voter ID laws are not suggested because Republicans are evil racists, but because voter fraud is an actual problem.