Fresh off the news that the Walt Disney Company will hand unsuspecting parents a sexual-hand grenade in the form of an "openly gay moment" in the upcoming live-action fairy tale "Beauty and the Beast" (which is also all about "empowerment"), Hollywood is taking a massive beating on television with respect to two very high-profile LGBTQQIP2SAA (I think I have that correct -- I'll make any updates as they occur) TV shows.

The first casualty was also the first cancellation of the season. The CBS legal drama "Doubt" earned the axe after just three episodes. The show made history as the first to add a recurring transgender character to a regular series. Laverne Cox, a man who wants to be a woman, starred in the role.

On top of the "making history" publicity boon, the series also boasted a Big Star in the form of Katherine Heigl. Nevertheless, it crashed and died upon liftoff with the lowest ratings of any CBS debut show. Roughly 5 million people tuned in.

The second casualty is the ABC miniseries "When We Rise," which covers the beginnings of the LGBTQQIP2SAA movement. The show was hyped endlessly by the network and the entertainment media, but could only scrape up a paltry 3 million viewers, which put it in last place among the Big 4 networks and ended in a humiliating tie with the CW.

Many times over the years I have publicly expressed my gratitude to Hollywood for the fine work the film and television industry did in changing attitudes towards homosexuals, especially in recognizing our shared humanity. That was a righteous and, yes, Christian act. But now I'm going to express an opinion I'm not supposed to express…

Man alive, I'm sick of gay.

Hey, live and let live. What consenting adults do is the least of my concerns. Godspeed. I wish you nothing but happiness. But I'm tired of being preached to, tired of identity-politics being jammed down my throat, tired of being sucker-punched, hectored, lectured, and told that unless I accept this as "normal" there is something morally wrong with me.

Sorry, but like a massive swath of the population, I am a heterosexual, and no matter how hard you try, the sight of two men being intimate will always make me uncomfortable (in my defense, two woman is kinda hot).

Is it okay if I don't want to be made uncomfortable at a Disney movie, or while watching network television? Does it make me homophobic that I am never-ever going to watch "Moonlight," specifically because I don't want to watch two guys kiss, or to be told that what I believe to be a sin is something beautiful?

Moreover, because I am a compassionate and decent American who wishes only the best for everyone, what I truly resent is this horrific attempt by the mercenary Left to normalize transgenderism. These are individuals desperately in need of intense psychological help. Normalizing mental illness, celebrating it as some kind of "cool identity," is nothing less than using the psychologically vulnerable as cannon fodder in a political war.

On top of that, there is the relentless, Orwellian oppressiveness of all of the entertainment and media culture demanding I give in to a lie, the lie that transgenderism in not a mental illness.

Making transgenderism a "lifestyle choice" is like making schizophrenia, depression, addiction, bulimia, or a bipolar disorder, a "lifestyle choice." How evil do you have to be to do such a thing, to exploit the mentally ill as a means to score political points?

Finally, caring parents do not want to exit a Disney movie or turn off the TV, only to find themselves having to explain human sexuality to their child long before they ever intended.

Hollywood's demonic push to come between parent and child, to strip our children of their innocence long before it is healthy, is one of many reasons millions are turning elsewhere for entertainment.

Follow John Nolte on Twitter @NolteNC. Follow his Facebook Page here.