It remains to be seen how much President-elect Donald Trump will be able to achieve when he's in office, but there is one thing he will be able to do with ease: repeal regulations.

The New York Times reports that a law known as the Congressional Review Act allows both houses of Congress to repeal regulations with a simple majority vote 60 legislative days after the regulations were issued by the federal government. Congressional Republicans have tried to use to this law to repeal numerous regulations under President Barack Obama, but Obama would always veto such efforts. President Trump, on the other hand, would likely be more favorable towards them since he pledged to repeal regulations during his campaign for president.

The George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center determined that there are over 150 regulations since May that could be repealed under the Congressional Review Act out of a total of 180 that have been issued in that same timeframe.

According to the Times, some of these regulations include:

■ Many environmental mandates, including limits on formaldehyde use and stricter truck fuel efficiency rules;

■ A Food and Drug Administration ban on the sale of antibacterial soaps;

■ A requirement that federal contractors provide paid sick leave for their workers;

■ Stricter consumer protections on prepaid debit cards;

■ Federal loan forgiveness for students at schools that shut down;

■ A rule that bars nursing homes that receive federal funding from requiring residents to resolve all disputes through arbitration, rather than in court.

The Hill also found 14 major regulations that Trump can repeal through the Congressional Review Act and other means, including:

  • The Interior Department's regulation that covered "well casing, transparency and wastewater storage for fracking on federal land" was struck down by a federal court, but the ruling was appealed by the Obama administration. The Trump administration could simply drop the appeal, and the regulation would cease to exist.
  • The Food and Drug Administration's regulations on "electronic cigarettes, cigars, and hookah."
  • The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's ban on "mandatory arbitration" contracts.
  • The Labor Department's regulation mandating "retirement advisers to act in the best interest of their clients and provide more disclosure."
  • The Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Water rule that allows "wetlands and ponds" to be regulated by the agency.

Clyde Wayne Crews Jr, policy director of the Competitive Enterprise Institute, compiled a list of 140 major regulations that could be repealed easily with Trump and the Republican Congress, including:

  • Amendments to the Americans for Disabilities Act.
  • Regulations on labeling and packaging on "veterinary biological products."
  • Regulations on agricultural equipment markings.
  • Regulations on central air conditioners.
  • New standards for municipal solid waste landfills.

The rest of Crews Jr.'s list can be seen here.